Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Six Tips to Help You Pay Your Tax Bill this Summer

If you get a tax bill from the IRS, don’t ignore it. The longer you wait the more interest and penalties you will have to pay. Here are six tips to help you pay your tax debt and avoid extra charges:

1. Reply promptly.  After tax season, the IRS typically sends out millions of notices. Read it carefully and follow the instructions. If you owe, the notice will tell you how much and give you a due date. You should respond to the notice promptly and pay the bill to avoid additional interest and penalties.

2. Pay online.  Using an IRS electronic payment method to pay your tax is quick, accurate and safe. You also get a record of your payment. Options for electronic payments include:
Direct Pay and EFTPS are free services. If you pay by credit or debit card, the payment processing company will charge a fee.

3. Apply online to make payments.  If you are not able to pay your tax in full, you may apply for an installment agreement. Most people and some small businesses can apply using the Online Payment Agreement Application on IRS.gov. If you are not able to apply online, or you prefer to do so in writing, use Form 9465, Installment Agreement Request to apply. The best way to get the form is on IRS.gov/forms. You can download and print it at any time.

4. Check out a direct debit plan.  A direct debit installment agreement is the lower-cost hassle-free way to pay. The set-up fee is less than half of the fee for other plans. The direct debit fee is $52 instead of the regular fee of $120. With a direct debit plan, you pay automatically from your bank account on a day you set each month. There is no need for you to write a check and make a trip to the post office. There are no reminder notices from the IRS and no missed payments. For more see the Payment Plans, Installment Agreements page on IRS.gov.

5. Pay by check or money order.  Make your check or money order payable to the U.S. Treasury. Be sure to include:
  • Your name, address and daytime phone number
  • Your Social Security number or employer ID number for business taxes
  • The tax period and related tax form, such as “2014 Form 1040”
Mail it to the address listed on your notice. Do not send cash in the mail.

6. Consider an Offer in Compromise.  With an Offer in Compromise, or OIC, you may be able to settle your tax debt with the IRS for less than the full amount you owe. An OIC may be an option if you are not able to pay your tax in full. It may also apply if full payment will create a financial hardship. Not everyone qualifies, so you should explore all other ways to pay before submitting an OIC. To see if you may qualify and what a reasonable offer might be, use the IRS Offer in Compromise Pre-Qualifier tool.

Find out more about the IRS collection process on IRS.gov.

Include a Few Tax Items in Your Summer Wedding Checklist

If you’re preparing for summer nuptials, make sure you do some tax planning as well. A few steps taken now can make tax time easier next year. Here are some tips from the IRS to help keep tax issues that may arise from your marriage to a minimum:

  • Change of name. All the names and Social Security numbers on your tax return must match your Social Security Administration records. If you change your name, report it to the SSA. To do that, file Form SS-5, Application for a Social Security Card. The easiest way for you to get the form is to download and print it on SSA.gov. You can also call SSA at 800-772-1213 to order the form, or get it from your local SSA office.
  • Change tax withholding. When you get married, you should consider a change of income tax withholding. To do that, give your employer a new Form W-4, Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate. The withholding rate for married people is lower than for those who are single. Some married people find that they do not have enough tax withheld at the married rate. For example, this can happen if you and your spouse both work. Use the IRS Withholding Calculator tool at IRS.gov to help you complete a new Form W-4. See Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax, for more information. You can get IRS forms and publications on IRS.gov/forms at any time.
  • Changes in circumstances. If you receive advance payments of the premium tax credit you should report changes in circumstances, such as your marriage, to your Health Insurance Marketplace. Other changes that you should report include a change in your income or family size. Advance payments of the premium tax credit provide financial assistance to help you pay for the insurance you buy through the Health Insurance Marketplace. Reporting changes in circumstances will allow the Marketplace to adjust your advance credit payments. This adjustment will help you avoid getting a smaller refund or owing money that you did not expect to owe on your federal tax return.
  • Change of address. Let the IRS know if you move. To do that, file Form 8822, Change of Address, with the IRS. You should also notify the U.S. Postal Service. You can change your address online at USPS.com, or report the change at your local post office.
  • Change in filing status. If you are married as of Dec. 31, that is your marital status for the entire year for tax purposes. You and your spouse can choose to file your federal tax return jointly or separately each year. It is a good idea to figure the tax both ways so you can choose the status that results in the least tax.

Thursday, June 4, 2015

Prepare for a Disaster – Plan to Keep Your Tax Records Safe

To mark the start of the hurricane season, the IRS urges you to make a plan to keep your tax records safe. Plans made before a disaster strikes can help you recover from the destruction left in its wake. The following tips can help you make that plan:
  • Use Electronic Records.  You may have access to bank and other financial statements online. If so, your statements are already securely stored there. You can also keep an additional set of records electronically. One way is to scan tax records and insurance policies onto an electronic format. You may want to download important records to an external hard drive, USB flash drive or burn them onto CD or DVD. Be sure you keep duplicates of your records in a safe place. For example store them in a waterproof container away from the originals. If a disaster strikes your home, it may also affect a wide area. If that happens you may not be able to retrieve the records that are stored in that area.
  • Document Valuables.  Take photos or videos of the contents of your home or business. These visual records can help you prove the value of your lost items. They may help with insurance claims or casualty loss deductions on your tax return. You should also store these in a safe place. For example, you might store them with a friend or relative who lives out of the area.
  • Count on the IRS for Help.  If you fall victim to a disaster, know that the IRS stands ready to help. You can call the IRS disaster hotline at 866-562-5227 for special help with disaster-related tax issues.
  • Get Copies of Prior Year Tax Records.  If you need a copy of your tax return you should file Form 4506, Request for Copy of Tax Return. The usual fee per copy is $50. However, the IRS will waive this fee if you are a victim of a federally declared disaster. If you just need information that shows most line items from your tax return, you can call 1-800-908-9946 to request a free transcript. You can also get it if you file Form 4506T-EZ, Short Form Request for Individual Tax Return Transcript, or Form 4506-T, Request for Transcript of Tax Return.
Visit IRS.gov for more information about disaster assistance.  Click on the “Disaster Relief” link in the lower left section of the home page. You can also type “disaster” in the search box. Get IRS tax forms and publications on IRS.gov/forms at any time.

Additional IRS Resources:

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

ACA and Employers: How Seasonal Workers Affect Your ALE Status

When determining if your organization is an applicable large employer, you must measure your workforce by counting all your employees.  However, there is an exception for seasonal workers.

If an employer’s workforce exceeds 50 full-time employees for 120 days or fewer during a calendar year, and the employees in excess of 50 who were employed during that period of no more than 120 days were seasonal workers, the employer is not considered an applicable large employer.

A seasonal worker for this purpose is an employee who performs labor or services on a seasonal basis. For example, retail workers employed exclusively during holiday seasons are seasonal workers.

The terms seasonal worker and seasonal employee are both used in the employer shared responsibility provisions, but in two different contexts. Only the term seasonal worker is relevant for determining whether an employer is an applicable large employer subject to the employer shared responsibility provisions.  For this purpose, employers may apply a reasonable, good faith interpretation of the term seasonal worker.

To learn more about this topic and about when the definition of a seasonal employee is applicable, see our Questions and Answers page.

See the Determining if an Employer is an Applicable Large Employer page on IRS.gov/aca for details about counting full-time and full-time equivalent employees.